IND’s Open House & Shadow Day at Notre Dame Preparatory School in Baltimore

You’re invited to attend IND’s Open House & Shadow Day on Saturday November 8, 2014 from 11 am to 2 pm.
What is IND?  The Institute of Notre Dame (IND) offers a unique educational experience for high school girls in the heart of Baltimore. Founded by the School Sisters of Notre Dame (SSND), our students are independent young women of strength, compassion and character.
Did you know? IND was the first school founded by the School Sisters of Notre Dame in the U.S. 168 years ago. We share their message of hope, faith and education for all. With deep roots in Maryland  IND remains where Blessed Mother Theresa founded us in 1847—in the heart of Baltimore. The urban experience is said to help develop their students’ inner strengths, depth of character and prepares them for the “real-world.”

Did you know? Strong and meaningful traditions connect our girls to the 11,500 alumnae who came before them. The numbers mean Improving the Baltimore community through Christian service that transforms their girls into strong advocates for themselves and others.

Check out what IND offers to its students:

  1. Individualized Academics IND focuses on what works for the specific girl through four learning levels. Careful attention and guidance ensure that all our students graduate college-ready.
  2. Best STEM Programs Next year IND will offer all three programs developed by Project Lead the Way®, the nation’s top provider of STEM curriculum—Biomedical Sciences, Engineering and Computer Science.
  3. Focus on the Arts Five new courses, a new dance studio, arts scholarships and planned upgrades to our historic Auditorium enhance our already popular Visual & Performing Arts Program.
  4. Activities & Athletics With more than 40 clubs and activities as well as 21 sports teams, their girls have many opportunities to pursue interests outside the classroom.
  5. Inclusive & Welcoming  Their students say they “felt welcomed as soon as they walked through IND’s front doors” and that their relationships feel like a “sisterhood.” At IND, community is as important as curriculum.
  6. Baltimore’s Our Campus Their unique location in a vibrant, creative city affords girls many opportunities to learn, work, volunteer and enjoy themselves all over Baltimore and beyond.
  7. Unique & Independent Girls – There’s a certain kind of girl that chooses IND. They call them INDie Girls. They’re independent, diverse, fierce advocates for themselves and others who enjoy a challenge. Once they graduate, they’re not only ready for college, they’re ready for life!

Be sure to check out some cool interesting history about the original Notre Dame of Maryland Collegiate Institute for Young Ladies.

  •  IND helped slaves reach freedom as part of the Underground Railroad. Sisters and students nursed both Union and Confederate soldiers during the Civil War.
  • On July 24, 1864, IND’s first class graduated in a public ceremony, accompanied by cannon fire and the burning of bridges between Washington and Baltimore.
  • During the buildup of WWI, the sisters were ordered to register and be fingerprinted, since most were German, and the U.S. was at war with Germany.
  • The sisters took care of students and each other during the deadly 1918 Flu Pandemic, as a few sisters succumbed to the disease.
  • When city buildings were burned during the riots of the late 1960s, IND was spared because of its relationship with the community.
  • In the 1970s, when other city schools left for the county, IND stayed. Their roots here are deep and their commitment to the people in the community surrounding them is strong.

Interested in learning more, why not contact IND today to schedule a Shadow Day: e-mail Ms. Bridget Bindel or call 410.522.7800 ext. 221.

DC Metro STEM event at George Washington University

Did you know? The Society for Developmental Biology is sponsoring a DC Metro STEM Event Developmental Biology, Birth Defects, and Diseases event.

What: You’re invited to a free public lecture which features scientists—including 2008 Nobel Prize winner, Martin Chalfie—who will discuss how studying development in model organisms gives us clues to origins of human birth defects and diseases that manifest later in life.

Look forward to learning from the following speakers:
1. Martin Chalfie, PhD (SDB President and 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Columbia University)
2. Irene Zohn, PhD (Children’s Research Institution)
3. Maximilian Muenke, MD (National Institutes of Health)
4. Susan M. Smith, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
5. Anthony LaMantia, PhD (George Washington University)

Who: The target audience is middle and high school students, teachers, and anyone interested in the development field of Science.

When: Wednesday, April 23 from 6 pm to 8 pm

Where: George Washington University ~ 2121 I St NW, Washington, DC 20052

FYI: For more information click here.